Independent National Security Legislation Monitor’s (INSLM) inquiry into certain questioning and detention powers

The Councils for Civil Liberties (“CCLs”)[1] have made a joint submission to the Independent National Security Legislation Monitor’s (INSLM) inquiry into certain questioning and detention powers (CQDPs) in relation to terrorism. Specifically, the review encompasses:

2016 Census

Liberty Victoria has in recent days been contacted by a number of persons concerned about the 2016 Census and the privacy implications for them.

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Human rights group backs doctors on whistleblowing

A human rights group has swung behind doctors who want the right to disclose what happens in detention centres.

Doctors for Refugees has filed a High Court challenge to the secrecy provisions in the Australian Border Force Act, contending that the laws inappropriately curtail people’s freedom to participate in political communication around conditions and care in detention.

Liberty Victoria welcomed this critical development. 

Danger of census facts leaking, Liberty Victoria warns

Information from next month’s census will be a “honeypot” for hackers, Liberty Victoria warned today.

“The safest way to keep data secure is not to retain it at all,” the human rights group said. “Information security can no longer be guaranteed.”

There are increasingly frequent instances of serious data breaches of personal information held by both government[i] and business.

Whistleblowers

Date: 
27 April 2016
Time: 
6.15 pm
Venue: 
The Wheeler Centre 176 Little Lonsdale St Melbourne

Don't licence protests, says rights group

Human rights group Liberty Victoria today expressed great concern about proposed legislation that would require permits to be obtained before people may protest.

Liberty president George Georgiou SC said, “We seriously question the need for such drastic action and urge government to look at alternatives before undertaking such measures.

Leave sentencing to the courts, warns Liberty Victoria

Liberty Victoria is concerned that the Attorney-General has elected to introduce a standard sentence scheme, contrary to the clear advice of the Sentencing Advisory Council’s report in response to the Terms of Reference provided in November 2015, Sentencing Guidance in Victoria. 

Liberty Victoria supports the Sentencing Advisory Council’s statement that sentencing guidance is best delivered by the Court of Appeal, and supports the proposed reforms to the Guideline Judgment regime.

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